LIFES GREAT BECAUSE YOUR ALIVE TO READ THIS - Lil B

(via diorpaint)

Right?

arrests:

Turquoise Almond Branches in Bloom, Vincent Van Gogh (detail)


Sure!

arrests:

Turquoise Almond Branches in Bloom, Vincent Van Gogh (detail)

Sure!

wetheurban:


PHOTOGRAPHY: Gordon Parks - Segregation Story
The Arthur Roger Gallery is pleased to present Segregation Story, an exhibition of photographs by Gordon Parks. The exhibition will be on view at the gallery from August 2 – September 20, 2014.
Gordon Parks is considered one of the most influential American photographers of the postwar years and was the first African-American to work as a staff photographer for Life magazine.
Read More

Good name to know wetheurban:


PHOTOGRAPHY: Gordon Parks - Segregation Story
The Arthur Roger Gallery is pleased to present Segregation Story, an exhibition of photographs by Gordon Parks. The exhibition will be on view at the gallery from August 2 – September 20, 2014.
Gordon Parks is considered one of the most influential American photographers of the postwar years and was the first African-American to work as a staff photographer for Life magazine.
Read More

Good name to know wetheurban:


PHOTOGRAPHY: Gordon Parks - Segregation Story
The Arthur Roger Gallery is pleased to present Segregation Story, an exhibition of photographs by Gordon Parks. The exhibition will be on view at the gallery from August 2 – September 20, 2014.
Gordon Parks is considered one of the most influential American photographers of the postwar years and was the first African-American to work as a staff photographer for Life magazine.
Read More

Good name to know wetheurban:


PHOTOGRAPHY: Gordon Parks - Segregation Story
The Arthur Roger Gallery is pleased to present Segregation Story, an exhibition of photographs by Gordon Parks. The exhibition will be on view at the gallery from August 2 – September 20, 2014.
Gordon Parks is considered one of the most influential American photographers of the postwar years and was the first African-American to work as a staff photographer for Life magazine.
Read More

Good name to know wetheurban:


PHOTOGRAPHY: Gordon Parks - Segregation Story
The Arthur Roger Gallery is pleased to present Segregation Story, an exhibition of photographs by Gordon Parks. The exhibition will be on view at the gallery from August 2 – September 20, 2014.
Gordon Parks is considered one of the most influential American photographers of the postwar years and was the first African-American to work as a staff photographer for Life magazine.
Read More

Good name to know wetheurban:


PHOTOGRAPHY: Gordon Parks - Segregation Story
The Arthur Roger Gallery is pleased to present Segregation Story, an exhibition of photographs by Gordon Parks. The exhibition will be on view at the gallery from August 2 – September 20, 2014.
Gordon Parks is considered one of the most influential American photographers of the postwar years and was the first African-American to work as a staff photographer for Life magazine.
Read More

Good name to know wetheurban:


PHOTOGRAPHY: Gordon Parks - Segregation Story
The Arthur Roger Gallery is pleased to present Segregation Story, an exhibition of photographs by Gordon Parks. The exhibition will be on view at the gallery from August 2 – September 20, 2014.
Gordon Parks is considered one of the most influential American photographers of the postwar years and was the first African-American to work as a staff photographer for Life magazine.
Read More

Good name to know

wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Gordon Parks - Segregation Story

The Arthur Roger Gallery is pleased to present Segregation Story, an exhibition of photographs by Gordon Parks. The exhibition will be on view at the gallery from August 2 – September 20, 2014.

Gordon Parks is considered one of the most influential American photographers of the postwar years and was the first African-American to work as a staff photographer for Life magazine.

Read More

Good name to know

dopenmind:

thebluelip-blondie:

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  
Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:
I don’t know who any of these folks are.
They were tourists I presume.
But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body. 
"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."
(Laughs.)
There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.
The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”
One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo. 
There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”
"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

I’m just gonna keep reblogging this because this is truly how white America works. Like people have their weddings on plantations, Blackface was and still is a major source of entertainment and the biggest movie of all time was Gone With the Wind. White America will kill Black people and then smile and laugh and enjoy their day it sickens me that we’re treated this way.


Forever reblog

… dopenmind:

thebluelip-blondie:

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  
Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:
I don’t know who any of these folks are.
They were tourists I presume.
But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body. 
"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."
(Laughs.)
There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.
The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”
One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo. 
There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”
"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

I’m just gonna keep reblogging this because this is truly how white America works. Like people have their weddings on plantations, Blackface was and still is a major source of entertainment and the biggest movie of all time was Gone With the Wind. White America will kill Black people and then smile and laugh and enjoy their day it sickens me that we’re treated this way.


Forever reblog

… dopenmind:

thebluelip-blondie:

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  
Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:
I don’t know who any of these folks are.
They were tourists I presume.
But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body. 
"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."
(Laughs.)
There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.
The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”
One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo. 
There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”
"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

I’m just gonna keep reblogging this because this is truly how white America works. Like people have their weddings on plantations, Blackface was and still is a major source of entertainment and the biggest movie of all time was Gone With the Wind. White America will kill Black people and then smile and laugh and enjoy their day it sickens me that we’re treated this way.


Forever reblog

… dopenmind:

thebluelip-blondie:

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  
Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:
I don’t know who any of these folks are.
They were tourists I presume.
But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body. 
"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."
(Laughs.)
There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.
The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”
One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo. 
There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”
"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

I’m just gonna keep reblogging this because this is truly how white America works. Like people have their weddings on plantations, Blackface was and still is a major source of entertainment and the biggest movie of all time was Gone With the Wind. White America will kill Black people and then smile and laugh and enjoy their day it sickens me that we’re treated this way.


Forever reblog

… dopenmind:

thebluelip-blondie:

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  
Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:
I don’t know who any of these folks are.
They were tourists I presume.
But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body. 
"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."
(Laughs.)
There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.
The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”
One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo. 
There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”
"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

I’m just gonna keep reblogging this because this is truly how white America works. Like people have their weddings on plantations, Blackface was and still is a major source of entertainment and the biggest movie of all time was Gone With the Wind. White America will kill Black people and then smile and laugh and enjoy their day it sickens me that we’re treated this way.


Forever reblog

… dopenmind:

thebluelip-blondie:

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  
Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:
I don’t know who any of these folks are.
They were tourists I presume.
But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body. 
"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."
(Laughs.)
There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.
The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”
One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo. 
There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”
"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

I’m just gonna keep reblogging this because this is truly how white America works. Like people have their weddings on plantations, Blackface was and still is a major source of entertainment and the biggest movie of all time was Gone With the Wind. White America will kill Black people and then smile and laugh and enjoy their day it sickens me that we’re treated this way.


Forever reblog

… dopenmind:

thebluelip-blondie:

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  
Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:
I don’t know who any of these folks are.
They were tourists I presume.
But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body. 
"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."
(Laughs.)
There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.
The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”
One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo. 
There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”
"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

I’m just gonna keep reblogging this because this is truly how white America works. Like people have their weddings on plantations, Blackface was and still is a major source of entertainment and the biggest movie of all time was Gone With the Wind. White America will kill Black people and then smile and laugh and enjoy their day it sickens me that we’re treated this way.


Forever reblog

… dopenmind:

thebluelip-blondie:

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  
Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:
I don’t know who any of these folks are.
They were tourists I presume.
But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body. 
"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."
(Laughs.)
There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.
The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”
One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo. 
There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”
"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

I’m just gonna keep reblogging this because this is truly how white America works. Like people have their weddings on plantations, Blackface was and still is a major source of entertainment and the biggest movie of all time was Gone With the Wind. White America will kill Black people and then smile and laugh and enjoy their day it sickens me that we’re treated this way.


Forever reblog

…

dopenmind:

thebluelip-blondie:

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  

Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:

I don’t know who any of these folks are.

They were tourists I presume.

But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body.

"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."

(Laughs.)

There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.

The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”

One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo.

There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”

"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

I’m just gonna keep reblogging this because this is truly how white America works. Like people have their weddings on plantations, Blackface was and still is a major source of entertainment and the biggest movie of all time was Gone With the Wind. White America will kill Black people and then smile and laugh and enjoy their day it sickens me that we’re treated this way.

Forever reblog

monotonyofdomesticity:

Yoshitomo Nara

You tell ‘em!

monotonyofdomesticity:

Yoshitomo Nara

You tell ‘em!

urgetocreate:

Édouard Manet, The Grand Canal, Venice, 1874


Flowy

urgetocreate:

Édouard Manet, The Grand Canal, Venice, 1874

Flowy

red-lipstick:

Lapo Simeoni (b. 1979, Orbetello, (GR), Italy) - Fire      Paintings: Oil on Copper Fix on Wood

2hott4u

red-lipstick:

Lapo Simeoni (b. 1979, Orbetello, (GR), Italy) - Fire      Paintings: Oil on Copper Fix on Wood

2hott4u

p-i-r-a-d-o:

VIBE


Cephalopal!

p-i-r-a-d-o:

VIBE

Cephalopal!

dynamicafrica:

Styled by Mobolaji Dawodu - A Visual Catalog.
There’s a cinematic quality to almost every Mobolaji Dawodu styled and or photographed photo. So many of the images he has styled, photographed - or both - look more like something out of a film still than 2-D fashion magazine pages. This signature of his, that is both visually classic and communicative, is part of what makes Dawodu’s work so intensely captivating. Making use of subjects that always have an air of effortless cool and mystique, Dawodu is able to draw you to his images, through the use of aesthetic qualities, leaving the viewer highly intrigued as to the narrative that inspired it. It’s no surprise that Dawodu’s foray into the world of costume design, with films such as ‘Restless City’ and ‘Mother of George’ under his belt, has been beautifully successful.
Hailed by Complex as one of the most stylish men in media, Dawodu is the style editor-at-large at the Fader but has had his work appear in such publications as Vanity Fair, i-D and Paper, and worked on projects for PUMA, Nike, Kenzo, Converse and Apple. Born in Nigeria to a Nigerian father and American mother, much of his work has been influenced and informed by his bi-coastal background. 


Like oil paintings dynamicafrica:

Styled by Mobolaji Dawodu - A Visual Catalog.
There’s a cinematic quality to almost every Mobolaji Dawodu styled and or photographed photo. So many of the images he has styled, photographed - or both - look more like something out of a film still than 2-D fashion magazine pages. This signature of his, that is both visually classic and communicative, is part of what makes Dawodu’s work so intensely captivating. Making use of subjects that always have an air of effortless cool and mystique, Dawodu is able to draw you to his images, through the use of aesthetic qualities, leaving the viewer highly intrigued as to the narrative that inspired it. It’s no surprise that Dawodu’s foray into the world of costume design, with films such as ‘Restless City’ and ‘Mother of George’ under his belt, has been beautifully successful.
Hailed by Complex as one of the most stylish men in media, Dawodu is the style editor-at-large at the Fader but has had his work appear in such publications as Vanity Fair, i-D and Paper, and worked on projects for PUMA, Nike, Kenzo, Converse and Apple. Born in Nigeria to a Nigerian father and American mother, much of his work has been influenced and informed by his bi-coastal background. 


Like oil paintings dynamicafrica:

Styled by Mobolaji Dawodu - A Visual Catalog.
There’s a cinematic quality to almost every Mobolaji Dawodu styled and or photographed photo. So many of the images he has styled, photographed - or both - look more like something out of a film still than 2-D fashion magazine pages. This signature of his, that is both visually classic and communicative, is part of what makes Dawodu’s work so intensely captivating. Making use of subjects that always have an air of effortless cool and mystique, Dawodu is able to draw you to his images, through the use of aesthetic qualities, leaving the viewer highly intrigued as to the narrative that inspired it. It’s no surprise that Dawodu’s foray into the world of costume design, with films such as ‘Restless City’ and ‘Mother of George’ under his belt, has been beautifully successful.
Hailed by Complex as one of the most stylish men in media, Dawodu is the style editor-at-large at the Fader but has had his work appear in such publications as Vanity Fair, i-D and Paper, and worked on projects for PUMA, Nike, Kenzo, Converse and Apple. Born in Nigeria to a Nigerian father and American mother, much of his work has been influenced and informed by his bi-coastal background. 


Like oil paintings dynamicafrica:

Styled by Mobolaji Dawodu - A Visual Catalog.
There’s a cinematic quality to almost every Mobolaji Dawodu styled and or photographed photo. So many of the images he has styled, photographed - or both - look more like something out of a film still than 2-D fashion magazine pages. This signature of his, that is both visually classic and communicative, is part of what makes Dawodu’s work so intensely captivating. Making use of subjects that always have an air of effortless cool and mystique, Dawodu is able to draw you to his images, through the use of aesthetic qualities, leaving the viewer highly intrigued as to the narrative that inspired it. It’s no surprise that Dawodu’s foray into the world of costume design, with films such as ‘Restless City’ and ‘Mother of George’ under his belt, has been beautifully successful.
Hailed by Complex as one of the most stylish men in media, Dawodu is the style editor-at-large at the Fader but has had his work appear in such publications as Vanity Fair, i-D and Paper, and worked on projects for PUMA, Nike, Kenzo, Converse and Apple. Born in Nigeria to a Nigerian father and American mother, much of his work has been influenced and informed by his bi-coastal background. 


Like oil paintings dynamicafrica:

Styled by Mobolaji Dawodu - A Visual Catalog.
There’s a cinematic quality to almost every Mobolaji Dawodu styled and or photographed photo. So many of the images he has styled, photographed - or both - look more like something out of a film still than 2-D fashion magazine pages. This signature of his, that is both visually classic and communicative, is part of what makes Dawodu’s work so intensely captivating. Making use of subjects that always have an air of effortless cool and mystique, Dawodu is able to draw you to his images, through the use of aesthetic qualities, leaving the viewer highly intrigued as to the narrative that inspired it. It’s no surprise that Dawodu’s foray into the world of costume design, with films such as ‘Restless City’ and ‘Mother of George’ under his belt, has been beautifully successful.
Hailed by Complex as one of the most stylish men in media, Dawodu is the style editor-at-large at the Fader but has had his work appear in such publications as Vanity Fair, i-D and Paper, and worked on projects for PUMA, Nike, Kenzo, Converse and Apple. Born in Nigeria to a Nigerian father and American mother, much of his work has been influenced and informed by his bi-coastal background. 


Like oil paintings dynamicafrica:

Styled by Mobolaji Dawodu - A Visual Catalog.
There’s a cinematic quality to almost every Mobolaji Dawodu styled and or photographed photo. So many of the images he has styled, photographed - or both - look more like something out of a film still than 2-D fashion magazine pages. This signature of his, that is both visually classic and communicative, is part of what makes Dawodu’s work so intensely captivating. Making use of subjects that always have an air of effortless cool and mystique, Dawodu is able to draw you to his images, through the use of aesthetic qualities, leaving the viewer highly intrigued as to the narrative that inspired it. It’s no surprise that Dawodu’s foray into the world of costume design, with films such as ‘Restless City’ and ‘Mother of George’ under his belt, has been beautifully successful.
Hailed by Complex as one of the most stylish men in media, Dawodu is the style editor-at-large at the Fader but has had his work appear in such publications as Vanity Fair, i-D and Paper, and worked on projects for PUMA, Nike, Kenzo, Converse and Apple. Born in Nigeria to a Nigerian father and American mother, much of his work has been influenced and informed by his bi-coastal background. 


Like oil paintings dynamicafrica:

Styled by Mobolaji Dawodu - A Visual Catalog.
There’s a cinematic quality to almost every Mobolaji Dawodu styled and or photographed photo. So many of the images he has styled, photographed - or both - look more like something out of a film still than 2-D fashion magazine pages. This signature of his, that is both visually classic and communicative, is part of what makes Dawodu’s work so intensely captivating. Making use of subjects that always have an air of effortless cool and mystique, Dawodu is able to draw you to his images, through the use of aesthetic qualities, leaving the viewer highly intrigued as to the narrative that inspired it. It’s no surprise that Dawodu’s foray into the world of costume design, with films such as ‘Restless City’ and ‘Mother of George’ under his belt, has been beautifully successful.
Hailed by Complex as one of the most stylish men in media, Dawodu is the style editor-at-large at the Fader but has had his work appear in such publications as Vanity Fair, i-D and Paper, and worked on projects for PUMA, Nike, Kenzo, Converse and Apple. Born in Nigeria to a Nigerian father and American mother, much of his work has been influenced and informed by his bi-coastal background. 


Like oil paintings dynamicafrica:

Styled by Mobolaji Dawodu - A Visual Catalog.
There’s a cinematic quality to almost every Mobolaji Dawodu styled and or photographed photo. So many of the images he has styled, photographed - or both - look more like something out of a film still than 2-D fashion magazine pages. This signature of his, that is both visually classic and communicative, is part of what makes Dawodu’s work so intensely captivating. Making use of subjects that always have an air of effortless cool and mystique, Dawodu is able to draw you to his images, through the use of aesthetic qualities, leaving the viewer highly intrigued as to the narrative that inspired it. It’s no surprise that Dawodu’s foray into the world of costume design, with films such as ‘Restless City’ and ‘Mother of George’ under his belt, has been beautifully successful.
Hailed by Complex as one of the most stylish men in media, Dawodu is the style editor-at-large at the Fader but has had his work appear in such publications as Vanity Fair, i-D and Paper, and worked on projects for PUMA, Nike, Kenzo, Converse and Apple. Born in Nigeria to a Nigerian father and American mother, much of his work has been influenced and informed by his bi-coastal background. 


Like oil paintings dynamicafrica:

Styled by Mobolaji Dawodu - A Visual Catalog.
There’s a cinematic quality to almost every Mobolaji Dawodu styled and or photographed photo. So many of the images he has styled, photographed - or both - look more like something out of a film still than 2-D fashion magazine pages. This signature of his, that is both visually classic and communicative, is part of what makes Dawodu’s work so intensely captivating. Making use of subjects that always have an air of effortless cool and mystique, Dawodu is able to draw you to his images, through the use of aesthetic qualities, leaving the viewer highly intrigued as to the narrative that inspired it. It’s no surprise that Dawodu’s foray into the world of costume design, with films such as ‘Restless City’ and ‘Mother of George’ under his belt, has been beautifully successful.
Hailed by Complex as one of the most stylish men in media, Dawodu is the style editor-at-large at the Fader but has had his work appear in such publications as Vanity Fair, i-D and Paper, and worked on projects for PUMA, Nike, Kenzo, Converse and Apple. Born in Nigeria to a Nigerian father and American mother, much of his work has been influenced and informed by his bi-coastal background. 


Like oil paintings dynamicafrica:

Styled by Mobolaji Dawodu - A Visual Catalog.
There’s a cinematic quality to almost every Mobolaji Dawodu styled and or photographed photo. So many of the images he has styled, photographed - or both - look more like something out of a film still than 2-D fashion magazine pages. This signature of his, that is both visually classic and communicative, is part of what makes Dawodu’s work so intensely captivating. Making use of subjects that always have an air of effortless cool and mystique, Dawodu is able to draw you to his images, through the use of aesthetic qualities, leaving the viewer highly intrigued as to the narrative that inspired it. It’s no surprise that Dawodu’s foray into the world of costume design, with films such as ‘Restless City’ and ‘Mother of George’ under his belt, has been beautifully successful.
Hailed by Complex as one of the most stylish men in media, Dawodu is the style editor-at-large at the Fader but has had his work appear in such publications as Vanity Fair, i-D and Paper, and worked on projects for PUMA, Nike, Kenzo, Converse and Apple. Born in Nigeria to a Nigerian father and American mother, much of his work has been influenced and informed by his bi-coastal background. 


Like oil paintings

dynamicafrica:

Styled by Mobolaji Dawodu - A Visual Catalog.

There’s a cinematic quality to almost every Mobolaji Dawodu styled and or photographed photo. So many of the images he has styled, photographed - or both - look more like something out of a film still than 2-D fashion magazine pages. This signature of his, that is both visually classic and communicative, is part of what makes Dawodu’s work so intensely captivating. Making use of subjects that always have an air of effortless cool and mystique, Dawodu is able to draw you to his images, through the use of aesthetic qualities, leaving the viewer highly intrigued as to the narrative that inspired it. It’s no surprise that Dawodu’s foray into the world of costume design, with films such as ‘Restless City’ and ‘Mother of George’ under his belt, has been beautifully successful.

Hailed by Complex as one of the most stylish men in media, Dawodu is the style editor-at-large at the Fader but has had his work appear in such publications as Vanity Fair, i-D and Paper, and worked on projects for PUMA, Nike, Kenzo, Converse and Apple. Born in Nigeria to a Nigerian father and American mother, much of his work has been influenced and informed by his bi-coastal background. 

Like oil paintings

nativenudity:

Namibian Himba by Charles Roffey.

Playful expression !!!

nativenudity:

Namibian Himba by Charles Roffey.

Playful expression !!!

Aw Nana

Aw Nana

artlung:

Mo’ne Davis leads her team to win the Little League World Series
Davis will be the first American girl to play in Williamsport since 2004. She downplayed her personal accomplishment, but her pitching performance on national television showed that gender is no barrier.
"More girls should join boys’ teams so it could be a tradition and it wouldn’t be so special," she said.
Photo: Philadelphia Inquirer

This deserves attention

artlung:

Mo’ne Davis leads her team to win the Little League World Series

Davis will be the first American girl to play in Williamsport since 2004. She downplayed her personal accomplishment, but her pitching performance on national television showed that gender is no barrier.

"More girls should join boys’ teams so it could be a tradition and it wouldn’t be so special," she said.

Photo: Philadelphia Inquirer

This deserves attention